Monthly Archives: March 2015

What are Mint and Proof Sets? Basic Lesson 4

 

These sets contain the coins issued by the Royal Australian Mint (RAM) for use as currency (sometimes called circulation coins as discussed in Lesson 3). The sets usually contain the standard circulating coins of the year, however in the later issues some of the commemorative coins  started to appear.

Mint Sets

1994  Mint Set

1994 Mint Set issued by RAM

The coins used for mint sets are the coins minted by RAM for circulation. They are in mint condition in contrast to the coins distributed in the banking supply system, not having the usual bag knocks or rubbing marks.
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What are Commemorative Coins.? Basic Lesson 3

1993 $1 Royal Melbourne Show

Packaging used to house the 1993 $1 Landcare coin

 

Commemorative circulating coins are minted by the Royal Australian Mint (RAM) and have a unique design celebrating an important event or anniversary. They are therefore the non standard designs, but are still released for use as circulating currency and are legal tender.  These are the main types:

 

  1. Commemorative circulating coins minted for use as currency can be found in your loose change. These are minted for circulation and distributed the same way as standard  currency coins,  mainly through the bank system,  although some go to coin dealers who add value by putting them in special packaging to sell through retail outlets.  For example, the Landcare coin shown above.  These are type of commemorative coins that we will be discussing in this blog.  We will be offering blogs on the other types, below, in later editions.
  2. NCLT coins (non circulating legal tender coins)
  3.  Silver commemorative coins
  4. Coins minted just for the collector market

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What are Coins for Circulation? Basic Lesson 2

aust currency

I have written this blog about Australian circulating coins but the principle applies to other countries and currencies.
The Australian circulating coins are minted by The Royal Australia Mint (RAM) and are the coins you will find in your change. They are the coins (cash) used to buy and sell goods in the normal course of commerce.
The Perth Mint and occasionally other mints have minted coins for the Commonwealth of Australia during times of increased demand. Also the gold sovereigns were minted by various mints operating in Australia at the time.
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